Showing posts with label Andrew Gillum. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Andrew Gillum. Show all posts

Sunday, March 15, 2020

Statement from Andrew Gillum on entering rehab

Former Tallahassee mayor and current CNN commentator Andrew Gillum released the following statement about entering rehab to treat his alcoholism after being found drunk and incoherent in a hotel room.

“After conversation with my family and deep reflection, I have made the decision to seek help, guidance and enter a rehabilitation facility at this time,”

“This has been a wake-up call for me. Since my race for governor ended, I fell into a depression that has led to alcohol abuse. I witnessed my father suffer from alcoholism and I know the damaging effects it can have when untreated. I also know that alcoholism is often a symptom of deeper struggles. I am committed to doing the personal work to heal fully and show up in the world as a more complete person. I now need to firmly focus on myself and my family. I will be stepping down from all public facing roles for the foreseeable future. I want to apologize to my family, friends and the people of Florida who have supported me and put their faith in me over the years.”

Tuesday, May 07, 2019

Florida's Andrew Gillum calls bill to limit voting by ex-convicts a 'poll tax'

Andrew Gillum, the Tallahassee mayor who last November lost a close race to become Florida’s governor, sharply criticized new restrictions placed on voting by people with felony convictions at a congressional hearing on Monday. He said the new restrictions, passed last Friday by the Florida state legislature, amounted to a “poll tax,” one of the measures historically used in Southern states to prevent African-Americans from voting.

“The unfortunate thing” about Florida, Gillum said, was that “we almost look directly at how we disenfranchise as many people as we possibly can,” citing alleged attempts to close polling sites and dismiss absentee ballots.

Gillum made his comments at a Monday hearing of the Committee on House Administration devoted to voting rights in Florida. Gillum, a Democrat who lost in November to Rep. Ron DeSantis, now runs Bring It Home Florida, a group that seeks to register a million voters ahead of the 2020 presidential race, in which Florida will almost certainly play a critical role.

Gillum made his “poll tax” comments in response to a measure passed by the Republican-controlled Florida state legislature last week, weakening Amendment 4, a ballot initiative to allow former prisoners who have completed their sentences to vote in the state. The amendment, which would affect some 1.5 million ex-felons, passed with 65 percent of the vote in November.

Read more: Florida's Gillum calls bill to limit voting by ex-convicts a 'poll tax'

Sunday, January 27, 2019

Ethics complaint against Andrew Gillum will proceed

An ethics complaint against former Florida gubernatorial candidate and Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum will proceed after the state ethics commission found probable cause at a hearing Friday that he had accepted gifts, Gillum's lawyer confirmed.

Gillum faced six counts related to soliciting and accepting gifts -- including rental accommodations in Costa Rica, a boat ride to see the Statue of Liberty and tickets to see the Broadway musical "Hamilton" in 2016 -- Gillum's attorney Barry Richard told CNN.

"There's conflicting testimony as to what happened," he said.

At the hearing, the Florida ethics commission advocate considered the facts of the case and "recommended no probable cause on the account for soliciting gifts, and she recommended probable cause on the remaining counts, which were accepting gifts that exceeded $100," Richard said.

Florida law bans state officials from accepting gifts worth more than $100.

Read more: Ethics complaint against Andrew Gillum will proceed

Saturday, November 24, 2018

Can Stacey Abrams, Beto O'Rourke, or Andrew Gillum win a presidential race in 2020

By George L. Cook III AfricanAmericanReports.Com

Stacey Abrams, Beto O'Rourke, and Andrew Gillum have many things in common. All ran great campaigns in their bids for elected office, all made a footprint on the national political stage, they got people out to vote who usually don't vote on mid-term elections, and they all lost their elections.

Despite that last point there are many Democrats are clamoring for their favorite of the three to run for the office of President of the United States in 2020.

Don't dismiss their potential run for the highest office in the land. There is room and support for them in a Democratic primary as Democrats both old and young are clamoring for something fresh and new. They all have bright political futures as Governors or U.S. Senators if they choose to run for those offices again. There is room and support for them in a Democratic primary as Democrats both old and young are clamoring for something fresh and new.

In my opinion, all three have great strengths:

Abrams has the most inspiring life story and has 10 plus years experience as an elected official. O'Rourke is by far the best fundraiser and has an "Obama" like appeal that younger voters seem to gravitate to. Gillum has the most charisma, has the most experience in elected office, has executive office experience, and is the best natural politician of the three.

But does any of that translate in a winning nationwide campaign? I don't know to be honest with you.

Of the three who do you think could most likely win a primary and then go on to become President of the United States?

survey software

Saturday, November 17, 2018

Andrew Gillum concedes race to Ron DeSantis

Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum, along with his wife R Jai posted a video today in which he conceded the Florida Governor's race to Ron DeSantis. Watch that video below.

Saturday, November 10, 2018

Andrew Gillum withdraws concession as Florida recount begins

Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum (D) withdrew his concession to Republican candidate Ron DeSantis in the Florida gubernatorial race on Saturday as a recount in the state begins.

“I am replacing my words of concession with an uncompromised and unapologetic call that we count every single vote," Gillum said at a press conference.

Watch his full statement below:

Thursday, November 08, 2018

Andrew Gillum campaign issues statement on possibility of a recount

Officials with the Andrew Gillum for Governor campaign have released a statement regarding the results of the Florida governor's race and his decision to concede to opponent Ron DeSantis.

Gillum for Governor communications director Johanna Cervone made the following statement:

"On Tuesday night, the Gillum for Governor campaign operated with the best information available about the number of outstanding ballots left to count. Since that time, it has become clear there are many more uncounted ballots than was originally reported. Our campaign, along with our attorney Barry Richard, is monitoring the situation closely and is ready for any outcome, including a state-mandated recount. Mayor Gillum started his campaign for the people, and we are committed to ensuring every single vote in Florida is counted."

Saturday, November 03, 2018

VIDEO: President Barack Obama campaign rally for Democrat Andrew Gillum in Florida

President Barack Obama rallied for Democratic candidates in Florida on the pivotal last leg of the campaign trail. He spoke at an event in Miami on Friday to rally voters for gubernatorial candidate Andrew Gillum, Sen. Bill Nelson and others. Watch video of his entire speech below:

Tuesday, October 30, 2018

Andrew Gillum responds to Trump calling him a thief

Democratic candidate for Florida Governor Andrew Gillum took to Twitter to respond to Trump's ignorant remarks in which Trump referred to Gillum as a thief during a Fox News interview.

Monday, October 01, 2018

Former President Barack Obama endorses Andrew Gillum for Florida governor

Former President Barack Obama has endorsed Andrew Gillum to be the next governor of Florida. Gillum has made health care a central plank in his platform and Obama made note of it when he threw his support behind the Democratic nominee Monday morning.

“Andrew believes that health care is a right, not a privilege and he will make expanding Medicaid a priority on day one as governor,” said Obama, whose signature achievement as president was the Affordable Care Act.

“Andrew will expand access to affordable health care, protect Floridians with pre-existing conditions, invest in education, protect the environment and build an economy that works for all,” continued Obama, in a prepared statement.

The endorsement puts the national Democrats' three biggest hitters in the Tallahassee mayor's corner. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders campaigned with Gillum during the primary. And former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton will hit the campaign trail with the mayor later this month as he tries to be the first Democrat in 20 years to win a Florida governor's race.

[SOURCE: Tallahahassee.com]

Saturday, September 22, 2018

It's not a blue wave that's coming in the midterm elections — it's a black wave

But besides the blue wave roiling America, there is a very real black wave. And both political parties need to pay attention.

In one of the most historic election years in memory — besides the year a young U.S. senator from Chicago became the first African-American president and the year a pompous reality TV star and coddled businessman became the 45th — the American political landscape may drastically change.

Democrat Ayanna Pressley could become the first black female elected to Congress from Massachusetts.

Georgia Democrat Stacey Abrams could become the first black female governor America has ever had.

Democrat Andrew Gillum could become the first black governor of Florida.

Democrat Ben Jealous could become the first black governor of Maryland by besting a popular Republican opponent. It’s a long shot, but most voters in Maryland are Democrats.

So while much has been made of the blue wave making its way across America, we better pay attention to the black wave.

But besides the blue wave roiling America, there is a very real black wave. And both the Democratic and Republican parties, which have been tone-deaf to the disdain many Americans feel for traditional politics, better wake up.

SOURCE: USA TODAY]

Saturday, September 15, 2018

Stacey Abams, Ben Jealous, and Andrew Gillum appear together at Congressional Black Caucus legislative conference

It was a raucous scene that could have been backstage at a rock concert: camera flashes, fans clamoring for autographs, scowling bodyguards, reporters hungry for a scoop.

But the center of this attention wasn't Beyonce or the Rolling Stones. It was three black gubernatorial candidates who stood side by side in a throng of admirers, soaking up all that love.

If elected, Stacey Abrams of Georgia, Ben Jealous of Maryland and Andrew Gillum of Florida would give America its largest number of black governors ever. That historic possibility was not lost on them, or the black voters who hope to make that history happen, as they shared the stage at the Congressional Black Caucus' annual legislative conference this week.

"This moment, and the significance of it, won't seep in for some time from now," said Gillum, mayor of Tallahassee, and at 39 the youngest of the three.

"What this signals is not only the continued evolution of our country but the increasing recognition of diversity, not only of capacity but of backgrounds," said Abrams, 44, later.

Abrams, who could become the nation's first black female governor, is getting the most national attention. But all three were squired around the Washington Convention Center by black politicos who are strategizing ways to help on turnout, campaigning and fundraising.

Jealous, 45, faces the steepest challenge, down in polls against incumbent Republican Gov. Larry Hogan. Abrams and Gillum are running for open seats.

After the three spoke together on stage, Jealous listened attentively backstage as Democratic U.S. Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee of Texas laid out plans to help him with voter turnout and fundraising. Gillum, meanwhile, stood nearby shaking hands with other state elected officials and Abrams conducted a media interview.

"I believe what we see in this current electoral cycle is not going to stop," Abrams said. "We have more diversity in the candidates running and in the candidates winning and particularly for women of color. ... I'm proud to be part of a national trend and I think it's a trend that's becoming a permanent one for America."

None of them were heavy favorites in their primaries. Abrams is a longtime state official and former state House leader; Gillum has been a fixture of local Tallahassee politics since his college days; and Jealous is a former head of the NAACP and was a venture capitalist and activist before entering the governor's race last year.

Their historic primary wins - and the national attention it brought - will bring out Democratic voters who might not have voted in a midterm election otherwise, they said. Midterm elections typically draw fewer than half of those eligible to vote.

"I know we have people keep wanting to hedge on these races: 'Oh, you can win in the primary, but what happens in the general?'" Gillum said. "I honestly believe for all three of us, we are the best, and frankly, the most likely of the whole lot we were in to bring the kind of energy necessary in order to win states like ours."

The political trio seem comfortable together and readily quote one another in interviews. They also tease one another, as they did when they turned Abrams' observations about overcoming gender and racial barriers into jokes about their respective skin tones.

"I'm of a very rich brown hue," Abrams said.

"I'm richer," Gillum interrupted. "It's the only thing I'm rich in."

Jealous, who is biracial, smiled, then quipped: "No comment."

The three of them have known one another for many years, Jealous said. He met Abrams when they were both around 20 years old, he said, and they've known Gillum since he was about that same age.

"It's a special joy when you look to your left and look to your right and the people you see are the people you know and the people you trust," Jealous said.

P.B.S. Pinchback of Louisiana was the nation's first black governor during Reconstruction, serving from 1872 to 1873. The next would not come until 1990, when Douglas Wilder would be elected in Virginia. Deval Patrick was elected in 2007 and David Paterson served as New York governor from 2008 to 2010.

There has never been a black female governor in American history.

"What's more important to me is that I'm opening the doors for others who may not have seen themselves in positions of power and leadership, and I can speak for communities that are unseen and unheard," Abrams said.

All of them recognize the change their campaigns represent and what could be a unique place in history if they are all successful.

"It is a wonderful season we are in," said Bernice King, a daughter of Martin Luther King Jr., at a later event honoring black female lawmakers. "I'm excited about the midterm elections, and I know that regardless of what the outcome is that God still has his hands on us."

[SOURCE: Black governor nominees become stars in bid for history]

Thursday, August 30, 2018

Florida Democrat Andrew Gillum responds to Ron DeSantis 'monkey' comment

During an interview with CNN's Chris Cuomo Mayor Andrew Gillum, Florida's first African American nominee for governor, said that his opponent Ron DeSantis' "monkey this up" comment was used as a way to "incite" his base. He also discussed his victory in the Florida Democratic Primary.

Wednesday, August 29, 2018

Andrew Gillum wins Florida Democratic Primary for Governor

Democrat Andrew Gillum rode a surge of liberal support from young people and African Americans to a stunning primary victory Tuesday and the historic opportunity to be the first black governor in Florida’s history.

With 94 percent of the votes counted, Gillum had an unofficial 3 percentage point lead over his closest rival, former U.S. Rep. Gwen Graham. Gillum overwhelmed Graham in Miami-Dade and Broward, the state’s two largest Democratic counties, by more than a 2-to-1 margin, in the highest turnout for a midterm primary election in Florida history.

“I am overwhelmed,” Gillum told a cheering crowd of supporters at a victory party at Hotel Duval in downtown Tallahassee. “I want you to know that this thing is not about me. This race is about every single one of us. Those of us inside this room. Those outside of this room. Those who voted for me. Those who didn’t vote at all. And those who didn’t vote for me because they are Republicans. But I want to be their governor, too.”

Democrat Andrew Gillum rode a surge of liberal support from young people and African Americans to a stunning primary victory Tuesday and the historic opportunity to be the first black governor in Florida’s history.

With 94 percent of the votes counted, Gillum had an unofficial 3 percentage point lead over his closest rival, former U.S. Rep. Gwen Graham. Gillum overwhelmed Graham in Miami-Dade and Broward, the state’s two largest Democratic counties, by more than a 2-to-1 margin, in the highest turnout for a midterm primary election in Florida history.

“I am overwhelmed,” Gillum told a cheering crowd of supporters at a victory party at Hotel Duval in downtown Tallahassee. “I want you to know that this thing is not about me. This race is about every single one of us. Those of us inside this room. Those outside of this room. Those who voted for me. Those who didn’t vote at all. And those who didn’t vote for me because they are Republicans. But I want to be their governor, too.”

Gillum’s task now is to unify the Democratic Party after a primary in which the majority of voters selected a different candidate. He also must choose a lieutenant governor running mate by Thursday, Sept. 6.

Gillum will face off against Republican challenger U.S. Rep. Ron DeSantis in the November general election.

[SOURCE: MIAMI HERALD]